Teacher Learning Community

Spring 2018 TLC: Using Developmental and Cognitive Sciences to Enhance Instruction - Activity 4 Resources

Course leader:
SEED Team

Teacher Quality Standards

  • QS III: Teachers plan and deliver effective instruction and create an environment that facilitates learning for their students.
    • Element A: Teachers demonstrate knowledge about the ways in which learning takes place, including the levels of intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development of their students.

Understanding the Kids I Teach

Understanding of the continuum of development of students in general and specifically a knowledge of the developmental stages of the children in your classroom is an important step in putting to work in planning lessons that reflect the relationship of intellectual, physical, and emotional development of students, thereby providing appropriate learning experiences. In this activity you will explore developmental stages in general and specific ways that development impacts the grade level you teach. As part of the classroom implementation you will record your classroom and look for evidence of ways that student development affects learning.  Finally you will collaborate with a colleague and make small changes in your teaching practice that might better support your students developmentally.

Resources

This website provides information on developmental stages for children of different ages.  It includes tips and ideas on how to nurture the child at his/her stage.  

This article explores ways that teachers can guide students in the transition from elementary school to middle school.  

This article explores the unique developmental needs of middle school students.

This short article gives a description of the developmental nature of students in grades 3-5.  

This online program from PBS has resources and graphics that contain research and information on the teenage brain.  

This article gives implementation ideas and tips to engage students in developmentally appropriate practices.  

This article gives teaching suggestions for students from infancy to primary grades.  These recommendations come from the International Reading Association and the National Association for the Education of Young Children.  

This article explores how free play and attention to cognitive development should impact PreK-3rd grade students.  

This post provides broad information about several theories of child development in order to gain an understanding of the various influences on development.

 

Rick Wormeli shares his expertise in working with tweens.  This article list 5 strategies that help teens learn and feel comfortable in the classroom.  Each strategy is accompanied by examples and tips for teachers to try with their young adolescents.  

This short article gives an outline of a typical 12-year-old's demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of a typical 13-year-old's demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of a typical 10-year-old's demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of a typical 6-year-old's demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of a typical 7-year-old's demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of a 5-year-old"s demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of a 9-year-old's demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of a 5 1/2-year-old's demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of an 8-year-old's demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of an 11-year-old's demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

This short article gives an outline of the 14-year-old demeanor and developmental attributes.  "This is from the series based on Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Chip Wood focuses on the positive developmental attributes generally present in children at different ages."

In this chapter, Thomas Armstrong outlines the development of the brain with specific attention given to the adolescent brain.  Experiments and research are shared for the reader to fully understand how and why adolescents may behave in certain ways.  Educators get a better understanding of what works according to the adolescent brain. This is the first chapter of the book The Power of the Adolescent Brain.

The blog post introduces the work of Todd Rose and captures the idea that there is no such thing as average.  Embedded in the post is a 50-minute Talks at Google video by Todd Rose. Dr. Rose describes how he and colleagues began to question science based on averages and introduces three principles of individuality that clarify how to take advantage of this new science in education, business, and life. 

The video is calculated into the hours calculated for this resource.